Friday, November 30, 2018

Perros desamparados en Cuba [Homeless Dogs in Cuba] (Rene Gómez Manzano)--Fighting Against Animal Abuse in the Caribbean



Animal rights is not a conceit of developed states. There are those in the Caribbean who have also become much more active in the development of social knowledge of human dignity as expressed in human treatment of animals, and in the defense of animals against cruel and abusive treatment.  Among these is the  Cubanos en Defensa de los Animales (CEDA) [Cubans in Defense of Animals], a civil society which characterizes itself as a sociocultural and humanitarian project [un proyecto sociocultural y humanitario] centered in the Havana region. Its principal objective is to reduce the populaitons of street dogs and cats and to educate the public, especially children and youth , against animal violence ["El objetivo central de CeDA es disminuir las poblaciones callejeras de perros y gatos y educar a la población, especialmente niños y jóvenes, en la no violencia contra los mismos."].


CEDA's work has come to the attention of social media recently.  Rene Gómez Manzano writes about the efforts of CEDA which resulted in the punishment of an individual associated with a government research center who engaged not only in acts of cruelty to animals, but posted his activities on line. But Gómez Manzano also notes the dearth of public sanction against some of the conduct alleged to have been committed by this person and opens the issue of the need for legislation or other avenues of conduct management, to reduce the incidence of such acts. The article,  Perros desamparados en Cuba, follows below (Castellano only) and may be accessed where originally posted to CubaNet. While Gómez Manzano focuses on the sexual abuse involved in that case (see, e.g., here, and here for story from Indonesia), the more general issue of the human rights implications of animal abuse is worth much more intense consideration both in Cuba and among CARICOM states--to start. 

Important, as well, is the relationship between abuse and social media that is coming to occupy a more important role in these activities.  Social media appears to provide a larger space in both the performance of acts of cruelty (some abusers appear to crave an audience to enhance the value to them of their own debasement through acts of cruelty to animals), and in the possibility of the secondary effects that seem to satisfy an element of the population that appears to derive some vicarious pleasure from watching. Suppression may be impossible, but management may be more effective.  It is in this respect, in any case, that a "social credit" or data driven governance approach to managing human behavior might gain traction (e.g., here).


5-Flora Sapio on the Zero Draft of a Legally Binding Instrument to regulate the activities of transnational corporations and other business enterprise (Article 9 Prevention)

(Pix © Larry Catá Backer 2018; Musée Ariana, porcelain figures Meissen 1725-1730 )

Flora Sapio (Comments on the "Zero-Draft"), and I (Making Sausages?: Preliminary Thoughts on the "Zero-Draft") have been considering the challenges posed by the Zero Draft.  But we wanted to dig deeper.  To that end we wanted to avoid the altogether too easy exercise of textual exegesis to suggest the challenges that this draft might construct for itself.

Rather than consider text, or text in light of the various mandates and principles purportedly manifested in the language used to build the Zero Draft, we thought it might be useful to consider text within the context of the initial commentary it might generate among Zero Draft stakeholders motivated enough to make them. These, then, might usefully inform the reading of text, and sharpen analysis of its structure and consequences. 

To that end, and in this and subsequent posts, Flora Sapio  presents summaries of discussions on each article of the Zero Draft, based on the written submissions available on the website of the OEIGWG.  These, then, will be woven together first to develop both a critique of the Zero Draft, and thereafter to suggest the value of an alternative, framework, model for such a project.

This Part 5 focuses on Article 9 of the Zero Draft (Prevention). 

Thursday, November 29, 2018

1-Reflections on the 2018 U.N. Business and Human Rights Forum



(Pix © Larry Catá Backer 2018)


The United Nations Working Group is to be commended for putting together yet another highly interesting, relevant and successful set of programs for its 2018 Forum on Business and Human Rights (and here). As the Forum has increased in visibility and popularity, the task of producing relevant and up to date programs that engage key stakeholders in a rapidly changing environment becomes ever more difficult. 



This post includes reflections on the 2018 and some suggestions for future consideration as the Working Group continue to strive for perfection in the organization of this important event. 

4-Flora Sapio on the Zero Draft of a Legally Binding Instrument to regulate the activities of transnational corporations and other business enterprise (Article 13 Consistency with International Law)

(Pix © Larry Catá Backer 2018; Musée Ariana, porcelain figures Meissen 1725-1730 )

Flora Sapio (Comments on the "Zero-Draft"), and I (Making Sausages?: Preliminary Thoughts on the "Zero-Draft") have been considering the challenges posed by the Zero Draft.  But we wanted to dig deeper.  To that end we wanted to avoid the altogether too easy exercise of textual exegesis to suggest the challenges that this draft might construct for itself.

Rather than consider text, or text in light of the various mandates and principles purportedly manifested in the language used to build the Zero Draft, we thought it might be useful to consider text within the context of the initial commentary it might generate among Zero Draft stakeholders motivated enough to make them. These, then, might usefully inform the reading of text, and sharpen analysis of its structure and consequences. 

To that end, and in this and subsequent posts, Flora Sapio  presents summaries of discussions on each article of the Zero Draft, based on the written submissions available on the website of the OEIGWG.  These, then, will be woven together first to develop both a critique of the Zero Draft, and thereafter to suggest the value of an alternative, framework, model for such a project.

This Part 4 focuses on Article 13 of the Zero Draft (Consistency with International Law)


Tuesday, November 27, 2018

2018 UN Forum for Business and Human Rights--Speaking to Coherence, Convergence, and Alignment in Open Markets for Human Rights Due Diligence





The 2018 U.N. Forum for Business and Human Rights has as its central theme: "Business respect for human rights – building on what works." That theme is realized through a focus on the central element of the UN Working Group's 2018 General Assembly Report on the role of the United Nation's Guiding Principles for Business and Human Rights (2011) Second Pillar (corporate responsibility to respect human rights) "human rights due diligence" mechanism (UNGP ¶¶ 17-22).  Many of the sessions at its program have been built around this theme.

This brief post considers the issues raised around a consequential issue of human rights due diligence underlined in the Forum through the opening statement of the High Commissioner for Human Rights ("The movement to ensure businesses uphold human rights is gaining momentum"), and highlighted panels on the 2nd day of the Forum")--the issue of coherence and alignment in business of standards for human rights due diligence.


3-Flora Sapio on the Zero Draft of a Legally Binding Instrument to regulate the activities of transnational corporations and other business enterprise (Article 7 Applicable Law)

(Pix © Larry Catá Backer 2018; Musée Ariana, porcelain figures Meissen 1725-1730 )

Flora Sapio (Comments on the "Zero-Draft"), and I (Making Sausages?: Preliminary Thoughts on the "Zero-Draft") have been considering the challenges posed by the Zero Draft.  But we wanted to dig deeper.  To that end we wanted to avoid the altogether too easy exercise of textual exegesis to suggest the challenges that this draft might construct for itself.

Rather than consider text, or text in light of the various mandates and principles purportedly manifested in the language used to build the Zero Draft, we thought it might be useful to consider text within the context of the initial commentary it might generate among Zero Draft stakeholders motivated enough to make them. These, then, might usefully inform the reading of text, and sharpen analysis of its structure and consequences. 

To that end, and in this and subsequent posts, Flora Sapio  presents summaries of discussions on each article of the Zero Draft, based on the written submissions available on the website of the OEIGWG.  These, then, will be woven together first to develop both a critique of the Zero Draft, and thereafter to suggest the value of an alternative, framework, model for such a project.

This Part 3 focuses on Article 7 of the Zero Draft (Applicable Law). 


Monday, November 26, 2018

Live Stream United Nations Forum on Business and Human Rights With Links to Events and Documents


Information about the 2018 United Nations Forum on Business and Human Rights thatis taking place 26-29 November 2018 in Geneva. Information and links on live streaming, documents and social media. Well worth exploring. 
 
Social media: Hashtag: #UNForumBHR / #bizhumanrights. Twitter follow: @WGBizHRs

2-Flora Sapio on the Zero Draft of a Legally Binding Instrument to regulate the activities of transnational corporations and other business enterprise (Article 6 Statutes of Limitations))


(Pix © Larry Catá Backer 2018; Musée Ariana, porcelain figures Meissen 1725-1730 )

Flora Sapio (Comments on the "Zero-Draft"), and I (Making Sausages?: Preliminary Thoughts on the "Zero-Draft") have been considering the challenges posed by the Zero Draft.  But we wanted to dig deeper.  To that end we wanted to avoid the altogether too easy exercise of textual exegesis to suggest the challenges that this draft might construct for itself.

Rather than consider text, or text in light of the various mandates and principles purportedly manifested in the language used to build the Zero Draft, we thought it might be useful to consider text within the context of the initial commentary it might generate among Zero Draft stakeholders motivated enough to make them. These, then, might usefully inform the reading of text, and sharpen analysis of its structure and consequences. 

To that end, and in this and subsequent posts, Flora Sapio  presents summaries of discussions on each article of the Zero Draft, based on the written submissions available on the website of the OEIGWG.  These, then, will be woven together first to develop both a critique of the Zero Draft, and thereafter to suggest the value of an alternative, framework, model for such a project.

This Part 2 focuses on Article 6 of the Zero Draft (Statutes of Limitation). 

Sunday, November 25, 2018

14-Introducing "Cuba's Caribbean Marxism: Essays on Ideology, Government, Society, and Economy in the Post Fidel Castro Era" ("From Ideology to Cuban Constitutional Reform")


 

I reported the publication of Cuba’s Caribbean Marxism: Essays on Ideology, Government, Society, and Economy in the Post Fidel Castro Era (Little Sir Press 2018; ISBN: 978-1-949943-00-9 (pbk); I SBN: 978-1-949943-01-6 (ebk)) (here). Cuba’s Caribbean Marxism is the first offering through Little Sir Press, a self-publishing collective that is a new project in broader knowledge dissemination of the Coalition for Peace & Ethics (more about that project here). Join us! 

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/G/01/SellerCentral/legal/amazon-logo_black.pngCuba’s Caribbean Marxism eBook may be accessed through these sites:


  https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/cuba-s-caribbean-marxism-essays-on-ideology-government-society-and-economy-in-the-post-fidel-castro-era    


Paperback ordering information to follow. Individual Chapters also may be ordered in pdf format.

I promised that over the course of future posts I would be introducing readers to the book. This post completes that overview with an introduction to Chapter 12 ("From Ideology to Cuban Constitutional Reform"),  which follows below.  Here for access to other posts in this series.  HERE for the video recording of the launch event for Cuba's Caribbean Marxism: Essays on Ideology, Government, Society, and Economy in the Post Fidel Castro Era, which took place 12 November 2018 at Penn State.


Saturday, November 24, 2018

Penn State CSR Lab: Report and Observations on Non-State Based Non-Judicial Mechanisms on the Ground (Prepared Feedback for the OHCHR Accountability and Remedy (ARP) III Report)



The United Nations Accountability and Remedy Project (ARP) was developed through a strongly backed initiative of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR). Starting in 2014, ARP has developed in three phases under multiple mandates from the UN Human Rights Council. While ARP I and ARP II considered carefully judicial mechanisms, and state based non-judicial mechanisms, ARP III focused on non state based non judicial remedial mechanisms. This last is an important and perhaps underdeveloped mechanism within the UNGP framework.

The OHCHR released a revised Report in November 2018 to generate additional feedback, including at a meeting organized therefor that takes place 29 November 2018 in Geneva. The principal focus of that meeting is to consider in some detail the five workstreams that serve as the heart of the ARP III Report. The OHCHR has welcomed additional feedback to aid in the finalization of the ARP III Report.

To that end the Penn State CSR Lab, an informally constituted collective of students and faculty at Penn State Law have produced this Report and Observations on Non-State Based Non Judicial Mechanisms on the Ground to aid the OHCHR as it moves the ARP III Report to conclusion.I am very proud of my students who had a substantial hand in putting this together and hope that their research and analysis proves useful to those who are undertaking the valuable ARP project.

The Penn State CSR Lab's Report to the OHCHR ARPIII team follows. It may also be accessed HERE.

13-Introducing "Cuba's Caribbean Marxism: Essays on Ideology, Government, Society, and Economy in the Post Fidel Castro Era" ("Reform and Global Corporate Social Responsibility")



I reported the publication of Cuba’s Caribbean Marxism: Essays on Ideology, Government, Society, and Economy in the Post Fidel Castro Era (Little Sir Press 2018; ISBN: 978-1-949943-00-9 (pbk); I SBN: 978-1-949943-01-6 (ebk)) (here). Cuba’s Caribbean Marxism is the first offering through Little Sir Press, a self-publishing collective that is a new project in broader knowledge dissemination of the Coalition for Peace & Ethics (more about that project here). Join us! 

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/G/01/SellerCentral/legal/amazon-logo_black.pngCuba’s Caribbean Marxism eBook may be accessed through these sites:


  https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/cuba-s-caribbean-marxism-essays-on-ideology-government-society-and-economy-in-the-post-fidel-castro-era    


Paperback ordering information to follow. Individual Chapters also may be ordered in pdf format.

I promised that over the course of future posts I would be introducing readers to the book. This post continues with an introduction to Chapter 11 ("Reform and Global Corporate Social Responsibility"),  which follows below.  Here for access to other posts in this series.  HERE for the video recording of the launch event for Cuba's Caribbean Marxism: Essays on Ideology, Government, Society, and Economy in the Post Fidel Castro Era, which took place 12 November 2018 at Penn State.
 

Friday, November 23, 2018

1-Flora Sapio on the Zero Draft of a Legally Binding Instrument to regulate the activities of transnational corporations and other business enterprise (Article 2, Statement of Purpose)

(Pix © Larry Catá Backer 2018; Musée Ariana, porcelain figures Meissen 1725-1730 )

Flora Sapio (Comments on the "Zero-Draft"), and I (Making Sausages?: Preliminary Thoughts on the "Zero-Draft") have been considering the challenges posed by the Zero Draft.  But we wanted to dig deeper.  To that end we wanted to avoid the altogether too easy exercise of textual exegesis to suggest the challenges that this draft might construct for itself.  

Rather than consider text, or text in light of the various mandates and principles purportedly manifested in the language used to build the Zero Draft, we thought it might be useful to consider text within the context of the initial commentary it might generate among Zero Draft stakeholders motivated enough to make them. These, then, might usefully inform the reading of text, and sharpen analysis of its structure and consequences. 

To that end, and in this and subsequent posts, Flora Sapio  presents summaries of discussions on each article of the Zero Draft, based on the written submissions available on the website of the OEIGWG.  These, then, will be woven together first to develop both a critique of the Zero Draft, and thereafter to suggest the value of an alternative, framework, model for such a project.  

This post considers Article 2 of the Zero Draft (Statement of Purpose). 

Conferência Ethos 20 Anos - Belém: Business, Human Rights, and Development



I am happy to pass along information about the upcoming 20th Anniversary Conference of the Instituto Ethos, a Brazilian organization with a principal focus on business and Human Rights.  It was created in 1998 to focus on socially responsible business.

More information on the conference (in Portuguese) may be found below. Links to prior conferences also included.


12-Introducing "Cuba's Caribbean Marxism: Essays on Ideology, Government, Society, and Economy in the Post Fidel Castro Era" (Globalization and the Caribbean Marxist Multinational)

 


I reported the publication of Cuba’s Caribbean Marxism: Essays on Ideology, Government, Society, and Economy in the Post Fidel Castro Era (Little Sir Press 2018; ISBN: 978-1-949943-00-9 (pbk); I SBN: 978-1-949943-01-6 (ebk)) (here). Cuba’s Caribbean Marxism is the first offering through Little Sir Press, a self-publishing collective that is a new project in broader knowledge dissemination of the Coalition for Peace & Ethics (more about that project here). Join us! 

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/G/01/SellerCentral/legal/amazon-logo_black.pngCuba’s Caribbean Marxism eBook may be accessed through these sites:


  https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/cuba-s-caribbean-marxism-essays-on-ideology-government-society-and-economy-in-the-post-fidel-castro-era    


Paperback ordering information to follow. Individual Chapters also may be ordered in pdf format.

I promised that over the course of future posts I would be introducing readers to the book. This post continues with an introduction to Chapter 10 ("Globalization and the Caribbean Marxist Multinational"),  which follows below.   Here for access to other posts in this series.  HERE for the video recording of the launch event for Cuba's Caribbean Marxism: Essays on Ideology, Government, Society, and Economy in the Post Fidel Castro Era, which took place 12 November 2018 at Penn State